Argos aims to circulate writing about topical matters of public and political import that is local, critical and accessible. We believe critical intellectual conversation should be heard here in Aotearoa-New Zealand, not simply published for credit in international fora for more limited and specialised audiences. Of particular interest to us is writing that grounds its concern with the public or political good of place-making in theory or philosophy.

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arts

by Argos as You as Argos

...—that one of the parts of the university perhaps best-equipped to ‘think’ about the implications of this current institutional environment is the part most at risk. Clark shows that despite the early modern development of the arts as a means of combatting ‘scholastic barbarism’, this faculty has long battled its own vulnerability. The arts (initially comprising philosophy, arts and sciences) consistently tracks as the last-and-least in the r...

...ink 'outside the box,' which is to say in 'innovative', 'creative' or 'entrepreneurial' (ICE) clichés ('crystallised thinking'), because they cannot think what a box is or does. Teaching the emergency Here is where the Arts, supposedly redundant due to their econometric deficiency, actually come in handy. If anyone knows anything about innovation, creativity, and enterprise—not to mention critique—it is scholars in the Arts, for whom these...

...d said and done. The Strategic Plan 2005-2012 was gridded like a spreadsheet where ‘objectives’, ‘measures’ and ‘key actions’ lined up in consequential order and where the university’s functions (marketing, biotechnology, the arts) sat, literally, in separate boxes. Back then, institutional aesthetics could still transparently reflect institutional intent. The 2005 plan was openly slick and bossy, a blue-toned business folio, and its only illustr...

...ching and research and, on the other, democratic ideals, teaching and research for public goods, and public accountability. In March 2013, just over half of fulltime tenured and tenure-track academic staff in NYU’s faculty of Arts and Science approved a non-binding resolution of no confidence in the University’s president John Sexton. Afterwards, both the president and the Board of Trustees stated they were ‘attentive’ to the vote and that ‘the t...

St Paul Street Gallery sits on the ridge known as Rangipuke that runs down to Rerenga-ora-iti (later Point Britomart), once the site of the pā called Tangihanga Pukeā. The name Rerenga-ora-iti can be translated as ‘the leap of the survivors’. It commemorates the capture of that pā by Kawharu of Kaipara and the beginning of Ngāti Whātua occupation in the region in the seventeeth century. The Learning Quarter is bound by the Motorway on its...

That IS intense political graffiti - jaunty dick and balls and all. I think when you’re little, encountering messages where you don’t expect them can be really exciting (still is, but, you know, different). As a very little kid, I would be bundled into the back of the car when mum drove into town to pick my dad up from work. I think I was just out of booster seat mode but still in ‘fuck if we are going in the car I need to take this blank...

Where to begin? Between the beginning of 2011 and the end of 2012, we tried to expose the reality of university life. We are here to take credit: we, the characters who exist outside the determination of capitalist democracy! As anyone who has ever written anything should know — but of course they don’t because they have the logics of a whole world against them! — the production of each and every ‘I’ serves to produce each and every instance o...

The Learning Quarter is bound by the motorway on its eastern side, Wakefield Street to its west and the strip of hotels running beside Anzac Avenue to the north. The naming of this ‘quarter’ is derived, in its oldest sense, in reference to the four parts into which a slaughtered animal is cut, and one of the earliest references in English is to ‘parts of the body as dismembered during execution’ (c.1300). Over time, the reference to ‘four’ loos...

How can we ‘Live within the Truth’ within neoliberal academia? In this short paper I will depict the Havelian notion of a post-totalitarian citizen and re-shape and apply it in a story that focuses on a Lecturer in the New Zealand tertiary sector. The Story of the Lecturer This story tells a tale of the ordinary, everyday life/work experience of a Lecturer, who coordinates an educational course, and who, in a Havelian sense, questio...

An activist who is required to act in ways which are secretive, unaccountable, and not open to dialogical engagement with others is an activist who is displacing activism in favour of professional elitism. Most of us working and studying in tertiary institutions in New Zealand are familiar with the corridor conversations, the grumbling after meetings, and the remarks over a cup of tea about how managerialism is changing the nature of our i...

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