Argos aims to circulate writing about topical matters of public and political import that is local, critical and accessible. We believe critical intellectual conversation should be heard here in Aotearoa-New Zealand, not simply published for credit in international fora for more limited and specialised audiences. Of particular interest to us is writing that grounds its concern with the public or political good of place-making in theory or philosophy.

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desire

by Argos as You as Argos

...ll; but if we understand politics as the process of asserting the capacity for thought which leads the way to overcoming the banality of life subsumed by the motivations of capital, then politics found itself repressed by the desire for order, and other internal limits, most notably, the internal limit of so-called ‘democracy,’ The Event —We were the inexistent! The teach-in in the library basement on 14 September 2011 was the event with which th...

...edge is a ‘heritage inspired’ knowledge system which often speaks of the wisdom of the ancestors. In the period 1980 to 2000, the revitalisation of mātauranga Māori was largely driven by quests for social justice and the desire for cultural revitalisation. In my own iwi setting, our efforts to revitalise this body of knowledge were inspired by a mix of ‘speaking back’ to colonisation—reasserting our identity for example— and the subsequent d...

as we while away the hours, it’s hard and hard not to adhere to an idle and industrious vigil with its formatting of the day’s functions. drifting and darting desires and designs have always burrowed their stings in precisely mechanised patterns into my flesh, heightening that sense of being taught. to construct through tears and holes we devour carefree experiments, following where error leads us forth. systems of all living matter could learn...

...born under auspicious signs. And, as we were forced to remind some professorial poetry pontiff who introduced us with a certain amount of disdain at a conference, a strategic optimism needn’t contradict a felt pessimism. The desire to ‘heroise’ the present is distinctively modern, we are told. Yet now the virility of the heroism of the present is measured in like- counts, retweets, reposts, references, and other regurgitations. The radical...

...lation articulates and disarticulates itself, within and against itself, at each time of use and persists in its own divisibility. Indeed, this divisibility leaves its mark within the institution of the university between the desire to conserve and defend an establishment, and an unavoidable exposure to what is unpredictable, to alterity and the event. So, finally, ‘without condition’: what does it mean? Exempt from dictations and servitudes;((17...

...conds, change from below often seems impossible, unthinkable. It is difficult for many academics and students living within the money economy to imagine escaping the structures of higher education; nor is there a clear shared desire to do so. Even as we work to critically understand the limits and possibilities of different alternatives, we are also interested in intensifying and expanding the critical spaces that remain within. How can we occupy...

...deeply intellectually and affectively enmeshed with the interests of all those involved. This community seeks to create a dialogue that ruptures with dominant ideological and moral parameters by recurring to those aspects and desires of existence which appeal to the very core of communal life: family, love, festivity, and a shared historical and cultural past. Within these demonstrations, a special role is played by flash mobs as a means of perfo...

...ation of all public entities. At its heart, public choice theory views society as a collection of individuals (rather than groups) who are assumed to act rationally in order to maximise benefit given their own preferences and desires. But, we must ask, who better to fight for quality public tertiary education than those who participate in it daily? To dampen this ‘vested interest’ criticism, we must also ensure that any work (including work...

...so claim that any such ‘commonism’ can only be pursued if at the same time we recover the radical character of democracy. Part of the problem, however, when articulating change is the need to find a name around which the desire for change can come together, and in this regard democracy still has a lot of purchase in the popular imagination. Neither closed around the atomised individual nor any predefined dogma, democracy—or rather the demos—...

...esearch that isn’t sufficiently lucrative, the baggy employment contracts with too many ‘conditions’, the unwieldy administrative structures, the students who perhaps need a university education the most. It loses much in its desire to move so fast. Introduction The University of Auckland was founded in 1883 as a constituent college of the University of New Zealand, placing the advantages of a university education, so it was claimed, ‘within the...

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