Argos aims to circulate writing about topical matters of public and political import that is local, critical and accessible. We believe critical intellectual conversation should be heard here in Aotearoa-New Zealand, not simply published for credit in international fora for more limited and specialised audiences. Of particular interest to us is writing that grounds its concern with the public or political good of place-making in theory or philosophy.

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research

by Argos as You as Argos

A checklist Systems of reward driven by the imperative to generate commodifiable research in accordance with the dictum ‘publish or perish’ Individual and institutional stature-seeking and grandstanding based on productivity and performance indicators such as peer-reviewed publication outputs Ever-increasing levels of disciplinary specialisation permitting ever- increasing numbers of academics to pose as innovators and so reap the symbolic...

...ions, locally and collectively. We want to build alternatives, non-monologic and non-administered worlds both inside and outside the university – ethics and sustainability projects in business schools, community-based science research and indigenous public health, critical analysis of ‘benchmarks’, ‘transferable skills’ and ‘strategic goals’ as part of subject knowledge.. From the vantage point of different institutions, countries and stages of c...

The university finds itself today teetering between finance and revolt. This is a precarious position, one that is precarious on both sides. On the one hand, finance provides what presents itself as a seamless and incontestable logic that can explain the rationale for student participation, the logic of governance and the direction of research. On the other hand, the logic of finance has opened a void over questions of judgement and reason that...

...the world—diminished, oppressed and suppressed through colonisation, abandoned by indigenous peoples themselves and revived through late twentieth century revitalisation. Working in a Whare Wānanga: 1996–2002 My teaching and research experience in our whare wānanga illustrates the change and transition that has been taking place. In 1996, I was offered the role of Kaihautū (convenor) of a Masters programme in mātauranga Māori. This graduate...

...now a significant body of academic work critiquing the current policy direction shaping higher education worldwide. The picture painted around the globe is of institutions and their staff being robbed of the spaces needed for research and teaching projects which are not countable, auditable, measurable or commercialisable, as their institutions are enveloped by what Richard Winter has called the ‘new higher education’ environment (NHE). Taki...

...tegy as the command of an army (stratos, that which is spread out) by a general (agos, leader). In order to execute its mission, the university must make itself lean, stripping away the bulges and excesses and stragglers: the research that isn’t sufficiently lucrative, the baggy employment contracts with too many ‘conditions’, the unwieldy administrative structures, the students who perhaps need a university education the most. It loses much in i...

...he service industry of the professional scientific faculties. This is another sense in which we might understand the University as a site of distributed cognition, a bureaucratic hierarchy made out of departments of thinking; Research and Development delivers products to Marketing. Annually the University Specific facilitates an ‘Entrepreneurship Challenge’, asking various nodes to supply competing innovations for the attention of an audience of...

...outcomes? Or is there an alternative based on recognising the contribution of all to the university project of enabling higher education? If the value of Māori and Pasifika students is associated with funding imperatives and research opportunities to address need, then the job is to create the interventions for these groups until ‘the job is done’. The alternative view is that Māori and Pasifika peoples are integral to the very identity of the...

...technical solutions to problems of population, food supply, global warming and so on. (What is the technical solution, for instance, to global surveillance, which technology itself gave rise to?) The shift in the weighting of research funding to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) disciplines, as is happening under current Government policy, may equally be viewed as simply an increase in investment in universities by the corpo...

...ether with some local responses to it, in Derrida Downunder. Here and in another essay entitled ‘Unconditionality or Sovereignty: The University at the Borders of Europe’, he gives the name ‘unconditionality’ to the research university’s hypothetical freedom from outside interference, to the privilege to put everything in question, even to put in question the right to put everything in question. He posits that ‘the modern university sho...

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