Argos aims to circulate writing about topical matters of public and political import that is local, critical and accessible. We believe critical intellectual conversation should be heard here in Aotearoa-New Zealand, not simply published for credit in international fora for more limited and specialised audiences. Of particular interest to us is writing that grounds its concern with the public or political good of place-making in theory or philosophy.

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teaching

by Argos as You as Argos

...and the limits and possibilities of different alternatives, we are also interested in intensifying and expanding the critical spaces that remain within. How can we occupy them otherwise? How can we revolutionise or reassemble teaching and research by altering the thoughts and practices according to which the logic of organized capitalism is sustained and legitimised? We suggest we need to start with dialectic. Today, higher education is o...

...iewed publication outputs Ever-increasing levels of disciplinary specialisation permitting ever- increasing numbers of academics to pose as innovators and so reap the symbolic benefits of ‘original’ discovery Subjugation of teaching to research activities whose focus is determined by market forces, budgetary constraints and probable return on investment The rise of modes of governance fostering conformity, calculability and competitiveness thr...

...llective transformation. In it, people think 'outside the box,' which is to say in 'innovative', 'creative' or 'entrepreneurial' (ICE) clichés ('crystallised thinking'), because they cannot think what a box is or does. Teaching the emergency Here is where the Arts, supposedly redundant due to their econometric deficiency, actually come in handy. If anyone knows anything about innovation, creativity, and enterprise—not to mention critique—i...

...cant body of academic work critiquing the current policy direction shaping higher education worldwide. The picture painted around the globe is of institutions and their staff being robbed of the spaces needed for research and teaching projects which are not countable, auditable, measurable or commercialisable, as their institutions are enveloped by what Richard Winter has called the ‘new higher education’ environment (NHE). Taking action aga...

...ion of the publicised ‘aims’ and prescribed pedagogies handed out in the first class of semester. The institute is a correspondence course you can visit. Of all the commodities abstracted by the University from its labourers, teaching was the most swiftly forfeited. The accreditation model has transformed the University into a transcendental corporation: the University Generic. Through the consistent making corporeal of cognition in the form o...

...rongly the case wherever theory could resist the injunction to do nothing more than gather data for the encyclopaedia, or proffer in the disingenuous demand for objectivity. This was very much contingent on who happened to be teaching where, and always subject to change. While it is clearly true that the university largely serves to subvert any radical thought into ‘writing papers for journals which no one ever reads and books which no one could...

...and take of ideas, and through hard or unhappy conversation. The university, then, is a house of knowledge, existent and potential, and profitable in the best sense of the word. Activities remain aligned for the most part to teaching, learning or research but these activities are fluid, neither strictly separable nor outsourceable. Students act as teachers, teachers find themselves learning and being taught, research and pedagogy turn out to be...

...d throughout the world—diminished, oppressed and suppressed through colonisation, abandoned by indigenous peoples themselves and revived through late twentieth century revitalisation. Working in a Whare Wānanga: 1996–2002 My teaching and research experience in our whare wānanga illustrates the change and transition that has been taking place. In 1996, I was offered the role of Kaihautū (convenor) of a Masters programme in mātauranga Māori. T...

...nd engage with students. This is not the same as the provision of remedial approaches framed as ‘academic support’ for at-risk students; a ‘clip on’ to mainstream approaches. This is about liberating university curriculum and teaching in ways that affirm the contribution of Māori and Pasifika as integral to its organizational purpose and identity. In so doing, the understanding of who belongs is expanded because the identity and practices of the...

...n take away. B It’s the same on the other end. You have to have a certain amount of faith in something to want to share it with people— A Yeah exactly. Goes both ways— B Assumes you’re getting the good stuff. M What about teaching in a collaborative environment, as opposed to having the one authority figure at the front of the lecture theatre and then a whole lot of individuals? A I guess it acknowledges that we all have something to give. B...

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